Just what the doctor ordered enroll in College

For Sharon Morris, attending college was just what the doctor ordered. She was diagnosed with Parkinson disease in 2003 and she was told learning something new might help.

She is surprised at how much taking that advice has helped her.

At age 61, she has rarely missed a day of class at HCTC s Kentucky School of Bluegrass and Traditional Music. Learning to write songs and to play music has given me a feeling of accomplishment. Being in school has been a confidence builder.

The music is therapy and forming a strong bond with the other students is wonderful. It enriches my life. This makes me feel young. I m blessed.

Sharon has performed publicly four times and has written six songs and has 30 to 40 songs in the works. She plays piano, guitar, and some mandolin.

She plans to graduate from the program and then possibly open a music store. She is pleased to have a chance to have such a music education so close to home. It s wonderful we have a school in Eastern Kentucky like we have here. All of the faculty members are great.

Sharon said she was told she would be housebound because of her Parkinson disease, but that hasn t been the case for her. She swims three and four times a week and that activity gives her energy.

Dean Osborne, director at the Kentucky School of Bluegrass and Traditional Music, values have Sharon Morris as a student. Having her enrolled has enriched our program. She is a constant inspiration. She succeeds in overcoming obstacles what would be a lifetime of obstacles to other people. I m extremely proud of her as a student, Osborne said.

She fondly remembers telling her daughter, Kim Gayheart, of her desire to enroll in college. She has supported me all the way.

Sharon, of Hazard, was a coal company accountant for 25 years but she said her involvement in the music school is truly enriching her life. I would encourage anyone who is retired to come to school here. It makes you feel young.

Anyone interested in enrolling at the music school can call 606-487-3102 or 800-246-7521, ext. 73630